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History

Bitten by the automotive bug at an early age while working in the family owned W-J Body Shop in Gadsden, Alabama. Alan Johnson decided to step away from the norm and opened Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop. The calling card for this new shop was the debut of a sanitary 1937 Ford Cabriolet at the 1993 NSRA Street Rod Nationals. From the moment the car rolled through the fairgrounds, the Pro’s Pick judges and magazine editors had all eyes focused on the soft yellow 37 Ford from Alabama. The car later went onto appear in many street rod enthusiast magazines which gave life to the new hot rod shop. Alan Johnson came to a pinnacle in the world of street rods. In 1997 Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop debuted a 1933 Ford Cabriolet Highboy at the Detroit Autorama for Jerry Karr. The car runner-up for the prestigious Ridler Award and won everything else it was eligible to win in Detroit. The ’33 won many Pros’ Pick awards and ended up being named twice Car of the Year honors by Goodguys Rod and Custom Association and Shades of the Past Car Club. The crowning moment was when Alan was invited to display the car center stage at the annual SRMA Banquet held during the annual SEMA Show. At the banquet, Street Rodder Magazine bestow upon Alan the honor of being named Street Rod Builder of the Year.

Since 1997, the momentum hasn’t slow this builder as Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop continues to build groundbreaking, award winning hot rods in the form of the 2006 Goodguys Street Machine of the Year winner Bob Johnson’s 1971 G-Force Cuda. The Cuda project sent shockwaves thru the Street Machine world on design, form, and performance. Following up the G-Force Cuda, is the talk of the street rod world, the 2009 Detroit Autorama Ridler Award winning 1932 Ford B-400 “Deucenberg” owned by Doug Cooper, is in a class all its own on form, function, and beauty.

With over 50 turnkey hot rod projects completed to date, the 20-plus years of evolution that shows in Alan Johnson and his talented crew’s work can’t exactly be pinpointed by one particular influence- it’s the sum of all the extra detail that makes a Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop influenced, classic hot rod stand out. It’s a simple and basic design that steps away from gaudy and more toward visually practical yet at the same time, cutting edge. Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop is not going to fall for riding this current wave of trendy theme hot rod building- Alan Johnson’s idea of building hot rods proves Johnson’s Hot Rod Shop is in it for the long haul.

In an industry filled with tons of builders and fabricators Alan Johnson and the JHRS crew are one of the few that have the same level of drive and dedication for the art of constructing high quality custom hot rods, always fighting to blend modern technology with true hot rod attitude. Enjoying every bit of the hot rod world- from meeting other builders and hot rod fanatics, to traveling to the next show- Alan Johnson- a true hot rod enthusiast.